Rabbit Safe Foods

NOTE: use your brain when giving foods to rabbits. start tiny, monitor health, and then increase portions. Too much of any one thing is never a good idea.

NOTE: I am NOT vouching for the safety of this list, as you will see from my personal notes that I don’t have a problem with some things that she says are a problem, and other things are cautionary that she doesn’t comment on. I saw it, thought hmm….this might give some ideas. Why not keep an reference to it.

The following comes from here.

Bunny Forage

I

‘ve been looking for a list of plants and such that are OK to feed to rabbits, as well as those that are big no-nos. I stumbled across this list while researching as to whether it is safe to feed pigweed to chickens (it seems to grow very well in spots where I have had my mobile chicken pen…)

I call this method of research where I find answers to one question while searching for the answers to another “Planned Serendipity”

The rest of what follows is from http://www.carlaemery.com/newsletter03.htm

Home-fed Rabbits–Rabbits are a little picker than chickens. They are, of course, herbivores. They like to eat at night. In the daytime when I’m working in the garden, I stuff their cages with stuff I know they like: sunflower stalks, Jerusalem artichoke stalks, Bermuda grass, celery and celery root, carrots, prunings from fruit trees. In the morning, there’ll be much less, as they eat their way through the jungle. A rabbit in a cage crammed with food is a happy rabbit! I grow wheat and snip off green tops for them. They love that too. Here’s more info on what rabbits can and can’t eat…

CAN EAT:

Acacia: no food value, but twigs can be entertainment
Alfalfa: fresh or hay
Apples: all parts
Barley
Beans and bean vines (not soybean)
Beets: both top and root of regular, sugar, or mangel
Bermuda grass
Blackberry bush leaves
Bluegrasses, including Canadian
Bread: dry, or soaked in milk
Buckwheat
Cabbage: some is okay, too much may cause goiter
Carpet grass
Carrot: root and tops.
Cereals (if fat-free and fresh)
Cheeseweed (malva)
Chicories
Clovers: any but sweet clover
Coltsfoot
Corn: fresh or dried ears, fresh or dried stalks.
Cow Parsnip
Crabgrass
Dandelion
Dogwood
Fescue: red, etc.
Filaree (stork’s bill)
Grains: all types, unless dirty, damp, or moldy
Grapefruit: all parts (don’t feed too much)
Grass: Lawn clippings, grass grains, as long as they carry no
insecticides & are fresh
Hazelnut leave
Jerusalem artichokes: tops, stems, or roots
Kale
Kentucky bluegrass
Knotgrass
Kohlrabi: all parts of plant okay
Kudzu
Lettuce: all kinds – personal note: be aware that iceberg lettuce can cause problems. Feed VERY limited amounts.
Lespedeza
Malva (cheeseweed)
Meadow fescue
Milk: fresh or sour, as well as milk products
Millet: foxtail and Japanese
Milo
Napier grass
Oats
Oranges: all parts (don’t feed too much)
Orchard grass
Panicgrass
Parsnips
Peas and pea vines
Plantain
Poplar
Potato: but, not peelings, sprouts or leaves!
Prairie grass
Redtop grass
Rhodes grass
Root vegetables
Rye, rye grass, and Italian rye grass
Sheep sorrel
Sorghum grains
Spinach: in limited amount
Sprouted grains
Sudan grass
Sumac
Sunflower: leaves, stalks, or seeds
Sweet potatoes: vines or tubers
Swiss chard: in limited amount
Timothy
Turkey mullein
Turnips: all parts of plant
Vetch
Wheat
Willow

BAD FOR BUNNY:

Some greens are high in oxalic acid in the uncooked state: pigweed, amaranth greens, spinach, comfrey, and Swiss chard. To a small-weight rabbit, especially a young one, these can be a problem. I do feed some spinach and chard to mine because they like it, but I don’t give them a whole lot. The plants listed below range from deadly poisonous, to hard-on-a-bunny, to no nutritional value.

Amaranth
Arrowgrass
Bracken fern
Bromweed
Buckeye
Burdock
Castor beans
Cherry leaves
Chinaberry
Chokecherry leaves or pits
Comfrey — Personal note: some folks feed this with no problems.
Fireweed
Foxglove
Goldenrod
Hemlock, poison/water
Horehound
Jimson weed
Johnson grass
Larkspur
Laurel
Lupine
Mesquite
Milkweed — personal note: yet wild bunnies have been known to eat this no probs.
Miner’s lettuce
Moldy bread, moldy anything
Oak
Oleander
Pigweed – personal note: mine will eat the young leaves, they leave the stalk and older leaves
Poppy
Potato leaves, sprouts, or peels
Rhubarb leaves
Soybeans or soybean vines
Sweet clover – personal note — what’s wrong with clover?
Tarweed
Tomato leaves

Other personal notes: mine will eat melon rinds of all sorts … plus any flesh I leave on them. I make a point of only feeding one slice per week. Don’t want to overdo this wet food at all. Mine do not do well on cabbage itself, they can handle limited amounts of broccoli stalks. I am VERY careful with this family of plants.

For other ideas check out carla’s page here.