2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 10,000 times in 2010. That’s about 24 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 6 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 157 posts.

The busiest day of the year was November 25th with 177 views. The most popular post that day was Are Turkey necks safe feeding?.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were mydog-parlance.blogspot.com, dogs.thefuntimesguide.com, squidoo.com, search.aol.com, and athomepets.webs.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for biking with dog, rabbit housing, cycling with your dog, what are organs, and biking with dogs.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Are Turkey necks safe feeding? May 2007
2 comments

2

Biking/Cycling with Your Dog December 2007
30 comments

3

Rabbit Safe Foods September 2008
5 comments

4

Rabbit housing January 2008
4 comments

5

How to Make your Own Tug-toy (for your dog that is) January 2008
4 comments

Cocoa mulch warning

Please share this with all the pet owners you know and ask them to do the same – the information you take a few minutes to share might prevent the senseless loss of other pets.

Please tell every dog or cat owner you know. Even if you don’t have a pet, please pass this to those who do. Over the weekend, the doting owner of two young lab mixes purchased Cocoa Mulch from Target to use in their garden. The dogs loved the way it smelled and it was advertised to keep cats away from their garden. Their dog (Calypso) decided the mulch smelled good enough to eat and devoured a large helping. She vomited a few times which was typical when she eats something new but wasn’t acting lethargic in any way. The next day, Mom woke up and took Calypso out for her morning walk. Half way through the walk, she had a seizure and died instantly.

Although the mulch had NO warnings printed on the label, upon further investigation on the company’s web site,  this product is HIGHLY toxic to dogs and cats.

Cocoa Mulch is manufactured by a variety of companies, and it has been shown  that “It is true that studies have shown that 50% of the dogs that eat Cocoa Mulch can suffer physical harm to a variety of degrees (depending on each individual dog). However, 98% of all dogs won’t eat it.”

*Snopes site gives the following information.

Cocoa Mulch, which is sold in a variety of places including Rona, home hardware and other Garden supply stores contains a lethal ingredient called ‘Theobromine’. IT IS LETHAL TO DOGS AND CATS. It smells like chocolate and it really attracts dogs. They will ingest this stuff and die. Several deaths already occurred.

Theobromine is in all chocolate, especially dark or baker’s chocolate which is toxic to dogs. Cocoa bean shells contain potentially toxic quantities of theobromine, axanthine compound similar in effects to caffeine and theophylline. A dog that ingested a lethal quantity of garden mulch made from cacao bean shells developed severe convulsions and died 17 hours later. Analysis of the stomach contents and the ingested cacao bean shells revealed the presence of lethal amounts of theobromine.

Emails of this sort are circulated every year.  names/dates/company names change.  BUT it is basically true that if you use cocoa mulch, be alert that some dogs will munch on it and potentially consume enough that they will have a negative reaction to it.

Salute to Canada!

I found this sitting in my OLD email account that I was clearing out of stuff I really don’t need to keep around.   Why take up space right?  And being as I am Canadian (Canada rocks by the way), I thought it a good piece to post.

Excellent article…enjoy!!!

A British news paper salutes Canada . . . this is a good read.

It is funny how it took someone in England to put it into words…

Sunday Telegraph Article From today’s UK wires: Salute to a brave and modest nation – Kevin Myers, The Sunday Telegraph LONDON –

Until the deaths of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan ,
probably almost no one outside their home country had been aware that
Canadian troops are deployed in the region. And as always, Canada will
bury its dead, just as the rest of the world, as always will forget its
sacrifice, just as it always forgets nearly everything Canada ever does.

It seems that Canada ‘s historic mission is to come to the selfless aid both of its friends and of complete strangers, and then, once the crisis is over, to be well and truly ignored.

Canada is the perpetual wallflower that stands on the edge of the hall, waiting for someone to come and ask her for a dance. A fire breaks out, she risks life and limb to rescue her fellow dance-goers, and  suffers serious injuries. But when the hall is repaired and the dancing resumes, there is Canada, the wallflower still, while those she once helped  Glamorously cavort across the floor, blithely neglecting her yet again.

That is the price Canada pays for sharing the North American  continent with the United States , and for being a selfless friend of Britain in two global conflicts. For much of the 20th century, Canada  was torn in two different directions:      It seemed to be a part of the old world, yet had an address in the new one, and that divided identity ensured that it never  fully got the gratitude it deserved. Yet its purely voluntary contribution to the cause of freedom in two world wars was perhaps the greatest of any democracy.

Almost 10% of Canada ‘s entire population of seven million people served in the armed forces during the First World War, and nearly 60,000 died. The great Allied victories of 1918 were spearheaded by Canadian troops, perhaps the most capable soldiers in the entire British order of battle.

Canada was repaid for its enormous sacrifice by downright neglect, it’s unique contribution to victory being absorbed into the popular  Memory
as somehow or other the work of the “British.”

The Second World War provided a re-run. The Canadian navy began the war  with a half dozen vessels, and ended up policing nearly half of the Atlantic against U-boat attack. More than 120 Canadian warships participated in the Normandy landings, during which 15,000 Canadian soldiers went ashore on D-Day alone. Canada finished the war with the third-largest navy and the fourth-largest air force in the world.

The world thanked Canada with the same sublime indifference as it had the previous time. Canadian participation in the war was  acknowledged in film only if it was necessary to give an American actor a part in a campaign in which the United States had clearly not participated – a touching scrupulousness which, of course, Hollywood has since  abandoned, as it has any notion of a separate Canadian identity.

So it is a general rule that actors and filmmakers arriving in Hollywood keep their nationality – unless, that is, they are Canadian.  Thus Mary Pickford, Walter Huston, Donald Sutherland, Michael J. Fox, William Shatner, Norman Jewison, David Cronenberg, Alex Trebek, Art Linkletter and Dan Aykroyd have in the popular perception become American, and  Christopher Plummer, British.

It is as if, in the very act of becoming famous, a Canadian ceases to be Canadian, unless she is Margaret Atwood, who is as unshakably Canadian as a moose, or Celine Dion, for whom Canada has proved quite unable to find any takers.

Moreover, Canada is every bit as querulously alert to the achievements of it’s sons and daughters as the rest of the world is completely unaware of them. The Canadians proudly say of themselves –  and are unheard by anyone else – that 1% of the world’s population has  provided 10% of the world’s peacekeeping forces. Canadian soldiers in the past half century have been the greatest peacekeepers on Earth – in 39 missions  on UN mandates, and six on non-UN peacekeeping duties, from Vietnam to East Timor, from Sinai to Bosnia.

Yet the only foreign engagement that has entered the popular on-Canadian imagination was the sorry affair in Somalia , in which out-of-control  paratroopers murdered two Somali infiltrators. Their regiment was then disbanded in disgrace – a uniquely Canadian act of self-abasement for which, naturally, the Canadians received no international credit.

So who today in the United States knows about the stoic and  selfless friendship its northern neighbour has given it in Afghanistan ? Rather like Cyrano de Bergerac , Canada repeatedly does honourable things for honourable motives, but instead of being thanked for it, it remains something of a figure of fun.

It is the Canadian way, for which Canadians should be proud, yet such honour comes at a high cost.

This past year more grieving Canadian families knew that cost all too tragically well.

*********************
Please pass this on to any of your friends or relatives who served in the Canadian Forces or anyone who is proud to be Canadian; it is a wonderful tribute to those who choose to serve their country and the  world in our quiet Canadian way.

Polar Bear at Play

WOW!:

Animals at Play

Stuart Brown describes Norbert Rosing’s striking images of a wild polar bear playing with sled dogs in the wilds of Canada‘s Hudson Bay.image0011.jpg

The photographer was sure that he was going to see the end of his huskies when the polar bear materialized out of the blue, as it were:image0022.jpg

Shortly before, the husky was crouched in a bow, tail wagging, ready to play. image0044.jpg

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The polar bear returned every night for a week to play with the dogs.

Searching for a Lost Dog

Dogs get lost.  It happens.  Sometimes it is deliberate (as in someone lets your dog out of it’s yard or unties it).   Sometimes it is accidental – car accident, gate left open that shouldn’t be, etc.  Sometimes your dog is just one that likes to escape.

It is good to know what to do should such an event happen.

Searching for your lost dog is  a good guide to be aware of.   It’s a PDF file so you would need to download adobe acrobat.

Dog Detective has posters one can use to assist in the search.

 FidoFinder also lists some good ideas to keep in mind when missing one’s companion.   They start from the basics of first having to make sure your dog is actually gone missing.  Sometimes dogs can just get so intrigued by something that they don’t come when they are called, and if you have sufficiently large property it may take you a while to locate them.  Only after you have determined that your dog is gone should you act, but act quickly!  Time is of the essence.